Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT IS ANAESTHESIA?

WHO ARE ANAESTHETISTS?

WHAT TRAINING DO ANAESTHETISTS UNDERGO? 

Australian trained anaesthetists are physicians who have completed a medical degree, followed by medical practice and then five or more years of post-graduate training (being called 'registrar') in the field of anaesthesia. 

During their registrar years, anaesthetists are extensively trained in human physiology (how the body works), particularly the brain, heart, lungs, kidneys and liver. 

At least six months are spent in critical care units, such as coronary care, neonatal, paediatric and adult intensive care. By the end of their training they have become experts on anaesthesia, resuscitation, critical care, and pain management. They then take the specialty examinations of the Australian New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and become certified specialists in Anaesthesia.

WILL I SEE MY ANAESTHETIST?

DOES THE ANAESTHETIST STAY WITH ME ALL THE TIME?

WHY CAN’T I EAT AND DRINK BEFORE MY SURGERY?

DO I TAKE MY NORMAL MEDICATIONS?

WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF ANAESTHESIA?